Siberian Ginseng

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Nature’s Sunshine Siberian Ginseng

(eleutherococcus senticosis)

Siberian Ginseng is a shrub with erect spiny shoots and is native to the Soviet Far East, Korea, China and Japan. Also known commonly as touch-me-not and devil’s shrub, eleuthero has been most frequently nicknamed Siberian ginseng in this country.

Although not as popular as Asian ginseng, eleuthero use dates back 2,000 years, according to Chinese medicine records. Referred to as ci wu jia in Chinese medicine, it was used to prevent respiratory tract infections, colds and flu. It was also believed to provide energy and vitality. In Russia, eleuthero was originally used by people in the Siberian Taiga region to increase performance and quality of life and to decrease infections.

What it does

Siberian ginseng contains eleutherosides which have powerful adaptogenic properties and immune boosting action. Studies show that Siberian ginseng enhances white blood cell activity, thus providing support to a compromised immune system. In addition, as stress suppresses immune function, the adaptogenic properties of this herb would even further promote resistance to infection.

Potential Uses

Athletic performance Immune Support Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Flu Tired all the time Stress

Other information

Although Siberian ginseng is not a true ginseng species, like ginseng it increases tolerance to various stressors (e.g. mental, physical, environmental). This herb helps normalise the way in which the body responds to stress triggers and acts to regulate the manufacture and secretion of adrenal hormones. It also strengthens the adrenal glands themselves, which is especially important to those suffering from chronic stress.

Siberian ginseng is regarded by herbalists as a gentler alternative to Korean ginsend and American ginseng and recommend it for women as a general tonic and balancer. it has been used by Russian athletes to enhance physical endurance during aerobic exercise.

Cautions

Generally, there are no side effects or contra-indications from using Siberian ginseng, though it should not be taken late in the day as it may affect sleep.

It should be avoided by anyone with uncontrollably high blood pressure.

If you take digoxin or any blood thinning medication you should consult your doctor before taking Siberian ginseng.

 

 

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